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:: Volume 22, Issue 1 (Iranian South Medical Journal 2019) ::
Iran South Med J 2019, 22(1): 62-76 Back to browse issues page
The Effects of Marine Algae on Osteoporosis
Maryam Nekooei1 , Mariya Zahiri2, Seyed Mohammad Shafiee 3
1- Department of Biochemistry, School of Medical Sciences, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran
2- Department of Anatomical Sciences, School of Medical Sciences, Bushehr University of Medical Sciences, Bushehr, Iran
3- Department of Biochemistry, School of Medical Sciences, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran , shafieem@sums.ac.ir
Abstract:   (560 Views)
Background: Osteoporosis is a prevalent bone disease caused by an imbalance between bone formation and resorption.  Nutritional factors are involved in the preven­tion of osteoporosis. Several treatments exist for osteoporosis including bisphosphonates, parathyroid hormone, estrogen therapy, and hormone therapy, which have their own side effects. In the quest for an appropriate treatment for osteoporosis, researchers are now turning toward the nature-based medications such as marine algae (seaweed). The aim of the present review is to investigate the effects of algae on osteoporosis.
Materials and Methods: We examined articles indexed in PubMed, Science Direct and Google Scholar databases. It should be noted that human studies on the beneficial effects of seaweed on osteoporosis are rare.
Results: Seaweeds have several health benefits including their effect on bone metabolism. Active ingredients of algae have anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant properties in addition to other features that heal various diseases. Research has shown that algae improve bone metabolism because they are a rich source of essential minerals such as calcium, magnesium, other bone-supporting elements, amino acids and growth factors.
Conclusion: The extracted compounds from algae are biocompatible, and do not have the side effects of synthetic medications; therefore, they can be used for osteoporosis treatment.
 
Keywords: Bone, marine algae, osteoporosis, therapeutic effects
Full-Text [PDF 586 kb]   (149 Downloads)    
Type of Study: Original | Subject: Endocrine System
Received: 2019/04/7 | Accepted: 2019/04/7 | Published: 2019/04/7
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Nekooei M, Zahiri M, Shafiee S M. The Effects of Marine Algae on Osteoporosis. Iran South Med J. 2019; 22 (1) :62-76
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