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:: Volume 22, Issue 2 (Iranian South Medical Journal 2019) ::
Iran South Med J 2019, 22(2): 90-105 Back to browse issues page
Phytochemical Properties and Inhibitory and Antioxidant Effects of the Decoction, Infusion and Hydro-Alcoholic Extract of Nepeta Race-mosa on α-Amylase and α-Glucosidase
MohammadMehdi Zarrabi1 , Behvar Asghari 2, Ammar Maryamabadi3, GholamHosseain Mohebbi4, Saeid Rashvand5
1- Department of Plant Production and Breeding Engineering, school of Engineering and Technology, Imam Khomeini International University, Qazvin, Iran
2- Department of Plant Production and Breeding Engineering, school of Engineering and Technology, Imam Khomeini International University, Qazvin, Iran , asghari@eng.ikiu.ac.ir
3- Research and development Department, Shakheh Zeytoon Lian Inspection Co, Bushehr, Iran
4- The Persian Gulf Marine Biotechnology Research Center, The Persian Gulf Biomedical Sciences Research Institute, Bushehr University of Medical Sciences, Bushehr, Iran
5- Department of Forests and Rangeland, Qazvin Agricultural and Natural Resources Research and Education Center, AREEO, Qazvin, Iran
Abstract:   (480 Views)
Background: As an important plant belonging to the Nepeta genus, Nepeta racemosa has been reported to be widely used in traditional medicine. The present study was conducted to investigate the phytochemical content and antioxidant and antidiabetic potential of the decoction, infusion and hydro-alcoholic extract of this plant.
Materials and Methods: The total phenolic content of the samples was determined using a slightly- modified Folin–Ciocalteu method. The DPPH free radical scavenging method was used to evaluate the antioxidant activities, and the Vanillin-Sulphuric Acid Method for the saponin content of the extract. Moreover, their inhibitory effects on α-amylase and α-glucosidase were investigated based on standard methods.
Results: The phenolic content of the plant decoction was found to be 222.8 mg of gallic acid equivalent per gram of dried extract and its flavonoid content 87.8 mg of quercetin equivalent per gram of dried extract. The highest saponin content obtained was associated with the hydro-alcoholic extract of the plant with 41.9 mg of quillaja equivalent per gram of dried extract. The plant decoction also showed the highest potential compared to the other samples in terms of antioxidant properties investigated using the DPPH and FRAP methods. Furthermore, the plant decoction showed great potential in terms of its inhibitory effects on α-amylase with 9.45 µmol of acarbose equivalent per gram of dried extract, and α-glucosidase with 33.57 µmol of acarbose equivalent per gram of dried extract.
Conclusion: According to the results, Nepeta racemosa was found to exhibit high levels of antioxidant and antidiabetic abilities, which are directly proportional to its phenolic and flavonoid contents.
 
Keywords: Nepeta racemosa, phytochemical properties, antioxidant effects, α-Amylase Inhibitor, α-Glucosidase Inhibitor
Full-Text [PDF 848 kb]   (140 Downloads)    
Type of Study: Original | Subject: Pharmacology
Received: 2019/05/18 | Accepted: 2019/05/18 | Published: 2019/05/18
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Zarrabi M, Asghari B, Maryamabadi A, Mohebbi G, Rashvand S. Phytochemical Properties and Inhibitory and Antioxidant Effects of the Decoction, Infusion and Hydro-Alcoholic Extract of Nepeta Race-mosa on α-Amylase and α-Glucosidase . Iran South Med J. 2019; 22 (2) :90-105
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Volume 22, Issue 2 (Iranian South Medical Journal 2019) Back to browse issues page
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